Fear or Dreams. What Motivates You to Save Money?


find money image credit: Good Search

I had a statistics professor in college who brought out the state lottery in class. “I don’t even mess with it until it’s over ten million.” Let’s remove some of the zeros from that. . . . What if you found ten dollars—what would you do with the money? What if fifty dollars was automatically deposited into your bank account every month? What would you do with that money?

What motivates you to save money? Is it fear of being without? Or, is it your dreams of  “one day” and “what if”? Do these aspects of motivation help you set goals, or pass through you thoughts until the next time.

Find out what motivates you. Fear or Desire. Decide to take a stand. If it’s fear and you’re not saving, then some may say you’re fooling yourself.  If your fear is not having enough, begin by putting aside money every single paycheck. You say you don’t have enough to do that. Do it anyway. Put aside even one dollar every paycheck. Do not label it “rainy day”; label it “savings”. You may scoff that one dollar isn’t enough. Hmmm… Funny. A second ago you didn’t have “enough” to save anything. You’ve got to prove to yourself there IS enough. Change your thinking, and change your life. Yes, even one dollar at a time.

If it’s desire and you take no action, you’ll never draw it to you. Sure, you may be gifted a car, or marry someone in “that” neighborhood, but that only goes so far. If you take action (and action begets action) you’ll change your consciousness, and by doing so, you’ll prove to yourself you don’t need someone else to save you —which opens the door for that good to come without strings, and enables you to share your good with others, too.

The on-line bank ING Direct (now Capitol One) allows customers to set up several savings accounts, and customers can name them. (Car, Travel, Financial Freedom, Life…) Happy saving!

For the Next Thirty Days


When I tell people I don’t have a television, I’ll get comments like, “You must get a lot done.” Or I’ll get looks like, What rock do you live under? I’ve been offered at least one television a year for eight years.

I’m not advocating everyone giving up their television. (Having one per house, and not in the bedroom, maybe.) I am encouraging people to look at what they do with their time, and think of what they’d do if they had more time. What have you thought of giving up? (Gossip, swearing, smoking, sugar, fat, negative thinking. . .) What do you want to do? (Yoga, sing, read, water color paint, cook. . .) Don’t have time to cook a healthy, tasty dinner? Get the family involved in the activity. Husbands can shop. Teens can chop onions. Families can talk during dinner (oh, aren’t we glad we gave the television away!)

Here’s a six minute video about trying something new for 30 days. By the way, it takes 27 days for something to become a habit. Once a habit is formed, you’ll miss it if you break the pattern.

Free Money


 image credit: Google

Boom! Wow! You’ve just won $1,000.00 after taxes.

What would you do with it?

It’s “unscheduled money” so would you use it for bills anyway? Or would you use it as “fun money”?

House repairs? Car savings? A year’s worth of dinner and movies? Travel? Clothes? Tools? Donations?

Sit with this idea of getting $1,000.00 and feel it. Pay attention to how it feels receiving the money, and making plans to spend it. If it doesn’t feel good, you’re in the moment of lack — wishing it were more than $1,000.00, or focusing on “it’s not real.”

Everything begins in the mind. Imagination is where it all starts for everything — the chair you’re sitting on; the computer you use. The idea is to feel the fun of the money and plans. That shifts your focus and energy to receiving and if you keep this up throughout the day, you’ll see a shift. Some may see it that day, others in a few days, and others a week or so. Don’t stress out about “doing it right.” Have fun. If it doesn’t feel good, don’t do it.

Sometimes I do this throughout the day. I’ll plan to spend it on yard art. Then a few hours later, I spend it on travel. I never tell myself, “You can’t re-spend it.” I just keep having the experience of receiving and planning.

Have fun with  your free money!

Cha-ching!